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Roman Gods and Goddesses L-P

Lactans
God of agriculture.
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Lalal
Etruscan moon goddess.
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Lara
A goddess of the underworld.
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Larenta(Dea Tacita)
The Silent Goddess. Earth Goddess.
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Lares(Lases)
Guardian spirits of house and fields. They were spirits of dead ancestors who protected the family.
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Larunda
House goddess.
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Larvae(Lemures)
Spirits of deceased family members.
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Lasa
Goddess of fate; usually depicted with wings and with hammer and nail.
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Lasa-Rakuneta
Etruscan winged goddess.
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Laverna
Goddess of unlawfully obtained profits, thieves, imposters and frauds.
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Lavinia
Goddess of the earth's fertility.
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Levana
Goddess and protectress of newborn babes.
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Libentina
Goddess of sexual pleasure.
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Libera
Goddess of the cultivation of grapes.
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Liberalitas
God of generosity.
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Libertas
Goddess of freedom and the Roman commonwealth. Goddess of liberty.
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Libitina
Goddess of corpses and the funeral. Goddess of death.
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Lignaco Dex
Forest goddess.
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Lima
Goddess of thresholds.
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Losna
Etruscan moon goddess.
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Lua
Goddess to whom the Romans offered captured weapons by ritually burning them. Goddess of plagues.
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Lucifer
God and personification of the morningstar.
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Lucifera
Name used for Diana as a moon goddess.
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Lucina
Goddess of childbirth.
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Lupa
The goddess she-wolf who suckled Romulus and Remus.
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Lupercus
God of agriculture and shepherds.
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Lympha
Goddess of healing.
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Magna Mater
Great Mother. Roman name for the Phrygian goddess Cybele, but also an appellation of Rhea. She is depicted as a dove and doves are her messengers.
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Maia
Goddess of the month of May and fertility. Goddess of spring warmth (and sexual heat). Wife of Vulcan.
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Maiesta
Goddess of honor and reverence.
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Mana
Goddess who presides over infants that die at birth.
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Manes
Di Manes ("good ones"). The euphemistic description of the souls of the deceased, worshipped as divinities.
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Marica
A water nymph.
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Matrona
Name used for Juno when worshipped as a protector of women from birth to death.
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Matronae
Three Mother Goddess of fertility. The are lovers of peace, tranquility and children.
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Matuta
Goddess of the dawn. Patroness of newborn babes, but also of the sea and harbors.
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Meditrina
Goddess of wine and health.
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Mefitis
Goddess and personification of the poisonous vapors of the earth.
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Mellona
Honey Goddess. Goddess who protects the bees.
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Mena
Goddess of menstruation. The word menstruation comes from her name.
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Mens
A mother/guardian goddess. Goddess of mind and consciousness.
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Mephitis
Goddess of noxious vapors. She protects her followers from poisonous gasses.
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Messia
Goddess of agriculture.
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Messor
God of agriculture.
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Miseria
Goddess of poverty.
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Mlakukh
Etruscan love goddess.
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Molae, The
Goddesses who presided over mills.
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Moneta
Goddess of prosperity and finances.
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Morta
Goddess of death.
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Muliebris
Protector of chastity and womanhood.
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Munthukh
Etruscan goddess of health.
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Muta
Goddess of silence.
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Naenia
Goddess of funerals. All her places of worship were placed outside the city's walls.
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Nascio
Goddess of childbirth; protector of infants.
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Nemestrinus
God of the woods.
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Nerine
Sabine woman supposedly married to Mars.
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Nerio
A minor Roman goddess, and the consort of Mars.
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Nixi
Goddesses who were invoked by women in labor and who assisted in giving birth.
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Nodutus
God who was held responsible for making the knots in the stalks of corn.
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Nona
Goddess of pregnancy.
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Nortia
Etruscan goddess of healing.
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Numina
Protective spirits of households, fields, individuals, gardens, springs. Pomona, Vertumnus, Pales, Silvanus, Terminus
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Nundina
Goddess of the ninth day, on which the newborn child received its name.
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Obarator
God of ploughing.
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Occator
God of harrowing.
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Opigena
Goddess of childbirth.
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Orbona
Goddess invoked by parents who became childless. Goddess of children, especially orphans.
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Palato
Daughter of the north wind and wife of the god of agriculture.
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Pales
Goddess of shepherds, flocks and the health and fertility of the domestic animals.
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Parca
Goddess of birth.
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Parthenope
One of the Roman Sirens. She was the mother of Europa.
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Partula
Goddess of birth.
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Patalena
Goddess who protects the blossoms.
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Patella
An agriculture goddess.
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Paventia
Goddess who protects children against sudden fright.
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Pecunia
Goddess who presides over money.
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Pelonia
Goddess who is invoked to ward off enemies.
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Penates(Di Penates)
Gods of the storeroom. Gods who presided over the welfare of the family.
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Pertunda (Prema)
Goddess who presides over the newlyweds' first sexual intercourse.
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Philemon and Baucis
A peasant couple remarkable for their mutual love. When Jupiter and Mercury wandered about on earth in human form seeking food and shelter, they were turned away by all, except Philemon and Baucis, an old couple, who offered them both, although they had little food to share. As a reward for their kindness, Jupiter offered to grant them a wish. They decided that when their time was near they wished to die together. Their wish was granted and Jupiter turned each into a tree when they died.
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Picumnus
God of growth and the fertility of the fields. Patron of matrimony and infants at birth and stimulated their growth.
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Picus
God of agriculture and prophecy.
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Pietas
Goddess and personification of feelings of duty towards the gods, the state and one's family and of justice.
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Poena
Goddess of punishment.
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Pomona
The goddess of fruit and fertility.
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Porus
God of plenty.
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Postverta
Goddess of the past.
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Potina
Goddess associated with the first drink of children or children's potions.
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Promitor
God associated with the bringing out of the harvest from the barns.
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Prorsa Postverta
Goddess who was called upon by women in labor.
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Providentia
Goddess of forethought.
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Psyche
A beautiful princess loved by Cupid. Venus, jealous of Psyche's beauty, ordered her son Cupid, god of love, to make Psyche fall in love with the ugliest man in the world. Instead, he fell in love with her, and spirited her away to a secluded palace where he visited her only at night, unseen and unrecognized by her. He forbade her to ever look upon his face, but one night while he was asleep she lit a lamp and looked at him. Cupid then abandoned her and she was left to wander the world, in misery, searching for him. Finally Cupid repented and had Jupiter make her immortal so they could be together forever.
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Pudicitia
Goddess of modesty and chastity.
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Puta
Goddesses who watched over the pruning of vines and trees.
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