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Roman Gods and Goddesses A-D

Abeona
Goddess who protects children when they leave the parental house for the first time.
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Abundantia (Abundita)
Goddess of abundance, prosperity and good fortune.
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Acaviser
An Etruscan goddess, one of the Lasas (Fates).
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Acca
Goddess associated with Hercules.
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Acca Larentia
An earth goddess. The foster-mother, as a she-wolf, that nursed Romulus and Remus.
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Adeona
Goddess who guides the child back home, after it has left the parental house for the first time.
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Aeneas
One of the heroes of the Iliad. Son of Venus.
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Aequitas
God of fair dealing.
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Aera Cura
Goddess of the infernal regions.
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Aestas
Goddess of summer; usually portrayed nude and adorned with garlands of corn.
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Aeternitas
Goddess and personification of eternity.
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Aetna
Aetna is the Roman mountain goddess after whom the Italian volcano Mount Etna is named. In some legends she is the wife of the smith god Vulcan.
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Africus
God and personification of the south-western wind.
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Albina
Etruscan dawn goddess; protector of ill-fated lovers. A white sow goddess similar to the celtic Cerridwen.
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Anceta
Goddess of healing along with Angita.
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Alemonia
Goddess who feeds the unborn child.
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Angerona
Goddess of secrecy, of the winter solstice and protection.
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Angina
Another goddess of health, specifically of sore throats.
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Angitia
Snake-goddess. Goddess of healing and witchcraft.
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Anna Perenna
Goddess of the new year, and who ruled human and vegetative reproduction.
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Antevorta
Roman goddess of prophecy and childbirth.
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Appiades
Concordia, Pax, Minerva, Venus, Vesta
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Arria
A heroic Roman whose husband was ordered by the emperor to commit suicide. The husband could not force himself to do so until Arria grabbed his dagger, stabbed herself, then handed the dagger to her husband saying, "It does not hurt."
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Ascanius
The son of Aeneas. he is the founder of the city of Alba Longa in Italy.
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Attis
A vegetation god.
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Averna
The Roman queen of the dead
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Avernales
Nymphs of the rivers of the underworld.
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Befana
(Italy) She is represented as an old woman who, although ugly, is also very kind. On January 5th of each year she distributes candy to the good children and lumps of coal to the bad.
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Begoe
Goddess of lightning and thunder.
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Bona Dea
Latin for "Good Goddess". The deity of fruitfulness, both in earth and in women. She was worshipped by the Vestals as the goddess of chastity and fertility.
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Bubona(Epona)
Goddess protector of animals.
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Caca
Goddess of fire or vice.
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Cacus
Fire deity, brother of Caca. Cacus, three-headed and vomiting flames, was a son of Vulcan. He was noted as a robber, and was strangled to death by Hercules when he stole some of Hercules' cattle.
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Camenae, The
These Roman water spirits dwell in freshwater springs and rivers. Their name means "foretellers". Their festival, the Fontinalia, was celebrated on October 13 by tossing good luck wreaths into wells. Among them are Aegiria, Antevorta, Carmentis (the leader), Porrima, Prorsa, Proversa, Postvorta, Tiburtis, and Timandra.
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Candelifera
Goddess of birth. She is identified with Carmenta and the goddess Lucina.
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Canens
Goddess and personification of song.
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Canente
Ocean nymph who grieved so much over the loss of her husband she dissolved in tears.
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Camilla
A virgin queen. She was so swift, it is said, that she could run over the sea without getting her feet wet. She was a warrior dedicated to the service of the virgin goddess Diana. In one myth Camilla led an army against Aeneas and his invading Trojans. On foot, and with breasts bare, she fought at the head of the army, but was killed by Aeneas. In another she is killed in battle by the Etruscan Arruns.
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Cardea
Protectress of little children against the attacks of vampire-witches. Goddess of thresholds and especially door-pivots, health.
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Carmenta
(Roman) A goddess of prophecy and midwifery; she also brought the art of writing to her land. She was said to assist a woman in labor and to tell the future of the newborn. One of the Camenae.
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Carna
(Roman) A pesonification of the physical processes of survival. "Carnal" is a derivative.
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Cinxia
Goddess of marriage.
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Clementia
Goddess of mercy and clemency.
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Clitunno
River God.
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Cloacina
Goddess who watched over the construction and preservation of sewers (think Cloaca Maxima, that famous sewer in ancient Rome). She was also the protector of sexual intercourse in marriage.
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Coinquenda
Goddess of trees.
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Collatina
Goddess of hills.
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Conciliatrix
Goddess of marital harmony.
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Conditor
God of harvesting the crops.
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Consentes Dii
The 12 chief Roman gods (a la the 12 Greek Olympian gods): Jupiter, Apollo, Neptune, Mars, Mercury, Vulcan, Juno, Diana, Minerva, Venus, Ceres, and Vesta.
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Consus
God who presides over the storing of grain.
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Convector
God of bringing in the crops.
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Copia
(Roman) Goddess of wealth and plenty, belongs to the retinue of Fortuna.
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Corus
God representing the north/north-west wind.
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Cuba
Goddess of infants. She brings sleep to them; her cohorts are Edulica who blesses their food and Portina who blesses their drinking. She is sister to Cunina and Rumina.
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Cunina
(Roman) Goddess who protected infants asleep in their cradles.
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Cura
(Roman) Goddess who first fashioned humans from clay.
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Cyane
Sicilian nymph, companion of Proserpina. She was so devastated over the loss of Proserpina that she cried until she became a well.
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Dea Dia
Ancient goddess of corn and agriculture, identified with Ceres.
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Dea Marica
Goddess of the marshes.
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Dea Tacita
Silent Goddess. Goddess of the dead.
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Decima
Goddess of childbirth. Triad with Nona and Morta.
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Dei Lucrii
Gods of profit.
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Decuma
One of the Parcae.
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Deverra
One of the three goddesses who protect young mothers. The other two are Intercidona and Pilumnus.
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Dia
Her name shows that she was one of Italy's original goddesses, but there is little information about her today.
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Dido
The Carthaginian Queen who was involved in an ill-fated affair with Aeneas (in the Aeneid).
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Disciplina
Goddess of discipline.
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Dius Fidus
God of oaths.
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Domiduca
Goddess who escorts the child safely back home.
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Domiducus
God who guides a bride to her new home.
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Domitius
God who kept a woman in the house of her husband.
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