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Roman Gods and Goddesses E-K

Edusa
Goddess with whose help small children learn to eat.
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Egeria
Goddess of birth. A water nymph who was religious adviser to Numa, King of Rome (700 BCE).
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Egestes
God and personification of poverty.
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Empanda
Goddess of openness and generosity.
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Endovelicus
God of good health and welfare of the people.
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Equestris
Protector of domesticated animals.
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Erichthonius
Son of Vulcan. He was deformed (had dragon feet). Athena put him in a box and gave it to the care of the daughters of Cecrops, with strict orders not to open the box. Naturally they opened it and what they saw so frightened them they jumped off Acropolis to their deaths. He later became the constellation Auriga, which is Latin for charioteer, as he is said to be the inventor of the chariot.
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Ethausva
Goddess of childbirth.
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Eventus Bonus(Bonus Eventus)
Good Ending. God of success in business and a good harvest.
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Fabulinus
God of infants.
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Facunditas
Goddess and personification of fertility.
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Fama
Goddess of fame or rumor. She is said to have many eyes and mouths. She travels about the world, first whispering her rumors to only a few, then becoming louder and louder till the whole world knows the news. She lived in a palace with a thousand windows, all of which were always kept open so she could hear everything that was said by anyone on earth. Her friends were Credulitas (error), Laetitia (joy), Timores (terror), and Susuri (rumor). She was known as Ossa to the Greeks.
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Fames
God and personification of hunger.
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Fauna(Marica)
Earth Mother. Fertility Goddess. Identified with Terra, Tellus or Ops. She was the wife of Faunus.
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Faustitas
Goddess who protects the herds.
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Faustulus
The shepherd who found and raised (with his wife Acca) the twins Romulus and Remus.
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Febris
Goddess who protects against fever.
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Februa
Goddess of purification.
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Februlis
Another goddess of purification.
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Februus
God of purification who dwells in the underworld.
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Fecunditas
Goddess of fertility.
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Felicitas
The goddess of good luck. She was a favorite of the Roman emperors and their generals.
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Feronia
Goddess who was invoked to secure a bountiful harvest.
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Fides
Roman goddess of good faith and honesty. Fides was the guardian of integrity and honesty in all dealings between individuals and groups. She was depicted as an old woman wearing an olive wreath and carrying a basket of fruit.
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Fluonia
Goddess who stops the menstrual flow.
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Fons
Goddess of fountains.
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Fontus(Fons)
God of wells and springs.
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Fornax
Goddess of the baking of bread.
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Fraud
Goddess of betrayal. She has a human face, the body of a serpent, and a scorpion stinger at the end of her tail.
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Fraus
God and personification of treachery.
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Fulgora
Goddess of lightning.
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Furina
Goddess of darkness and robbers. An ancient Italian goddess who is all but forgotten in myth now. Some mythographers believe she was one of the Furies.
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Galiana
(Etruscan) She saved her city from a Roman invasion by appearing naked on the battlefield. Her appearance so affected the Romans that they fell back in confusion.
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Geneta Mana
A goddess who presided over life and death.
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Genius/Juno
Guardian spirits for people. Women had their own genius, which was called a Juno. The Juno was the protector of women, marriage and birth. It was worshipped under many names: Virginalis (juno of the virgin), Matronalis (of the married woman), Pronuba (of the bride), Iugalis (of marriage), etc. The genius was usually depicted as a winged, naked youth, while the genius of a place was depicted as a serpent. (See also: Lares.)
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Giane
(Sardinia) A woodland spinning spirit, an average-sized woman with steel fingernails, long disheveled hair, and long, pendant breasts that she threw over her shoulders as she was working her magic loom. As she worked she would sing plaintive love songs. If a human man should respond she would have intercourse with him. The man would die when they were done and his child, a half-breed brute, would be born only three days later.
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Glaucus
God of the sea (according to Virgil).
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Hercules
The Romans borrowed this hero from the Greeks (Herakles) and changed his name into the familiar Latin one of Hercules (see under Heracles).
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Hippona
Goddess who presides over horses.
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Honos
God of morality and military honor.
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Hora
Goddess who presides over time and/or beauty.
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Horta
Goddess of gardens.
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Hostilina
Goddess who presides over corn in growth.
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Hybla
Sicilian earth goddess.
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Ilia
The Vestal virgin who became, by Mars, the mother of the twins Romulus and Remus. She is the daughter of king Numitor of Alba Longa, who was dethroned by his brother Amulius. Her uncle gave her to the goddess Vesta so she would remain a virgin for the rest of her life. Amulius had learned from an oracle that her children would become a threat to his power. However, because she had violated her sacred vow (by dallying with Mars), she and her children were cast in the Tiber. The god Tiberinus rescued her and made her his wife.
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Imporcitor
God of the third ploughing. Triad with Redarator and Vervactor.
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Indigites Dii
The group of original, native Roman gods, in contrast to the Novensiles Dii, gods imported from elsewhere. The Indigites Dii were only invoked in special situations. They are the protectors of homes, stables, barns, fields, meadows, et cetera.
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Indivia
Goddess of jealousy.
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Inferi Dii
Gods of the underworld.
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Inferna
Her name means "underworld"; used as an alternate name for Proserpina.
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Intercidona
Protectress of children and goddess of the axe. She guards new mothers from evil spirits.
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Interduca
Name given to Juno when related to the marriage ceremony.
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Inuus
Gods of herds.
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Jana
Moon goddess, wife of Janus.
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Janus
God of good beginnings, doorways, journeys, public gates, departures and returns, harbours, communication, navigation, daybreak, victory, endings, success, the seasons. The guardian of gates and doors, he held sacred the first hour of the day, first day of the month, and first month of the year (which bears his name). He is represented with two bearded heads set back to back, the better to see the year just ended and to face the year just beginning.
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Juga (Jugalis)
Goddess of marriage.
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Justitia
Goddess of justice. She is depicted as blindfolded holding two balanced scales and a sword.
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Juturna
Goddess of wells and springs. Goddess of fountains. In some myths she is the mother of Fons.
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Kerres
Ancient mother goddess. Probably an early form of Ceres.
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Kulsu
Ancient underworld goddess.
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