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Native American Gods T-Z

Talocan
The home of the Aztec gods.
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Tarhuhyiawahku
(Iroquois) The giant who holds up the heavens.
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Tawa
(Pueblo) The sun kachina.
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Tawiscara
(Iroquois) The evil twin brother of Ioskeha.
(Huron) Called Taweskare or Tawiskaro; The evil Creator-Twin.
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Tecciztecatl
(Aztec)Tecuciztecal. Moon god.
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Teoyaomqui
(Aztec)God of dead warriors.
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Tepeu
(Maya)Creator god. God of the power in the sky. He is one of the seven deities who assisted in creation.
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Tepeyollotl
(Aztec) Lord of uncertainty. Earth and cave god.
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Teteoinnan
(Aztec)Tozi. Mother of the Gods. Personification of the powers of nature. Goddess of healing and the sweat baths.
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Tezcatlipoca
(Aztec)Supreme God. Mirror that smokes. The Shadow. He who is at the shoulder. Smoking mirror. God of night and all material things. God of the north. Lord of the world and the natural forces. God of beauty and war, the lord of heroes and lovely girls. God of warriors, magicians, sorcerer, drought, harvest, dancing, music, magick, cold. God of war. He was represented in human form with a stripe of black paint across his face and an obsidian mirror replacing one of his feet. He was supposedly mutilated by the crocodile on which the earth rests. He was also called Yoalli Ehecatl (night wind), Yaotl (warrior), and Telpochtli (young man). As a creator god he ruled over the first of the four worlds which were destroyed prior to the creation of this one. In animal form he was a jaguar.
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Tieholtsodi
(Navajo) A water monster.
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Tirawa atius
(Pawnee) The supreme god.
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Tlacolotl
(Maya)God of evil.
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Tlahuixcalpantecuhtli
(Aztec)Tlahuizcalpantecutli. Lord of the Dawn. God of the planet Venus as the morning star.
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Tlaloc
(Aztec) Originally an Olmec god, worshipped as a jaguar deity. The one who makes things sprout. Lord of the sources of water. Lord of the water. Earth and nature God. God of agriculture, fire, and the south, thunder, hail, fertility, water, clouds, lightning. God of rain, springs, and mountains. He had control over fertility. He was represented as a man painted black with huge, round eyes circled by long-fanged snakes. He had two companions; Uixtocijuatl (goddess of sea water) and Chalchiutlicue (goddess of fresh water).
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Tlaltecuhtli
(Aztec)Earth Monster God, called 'Lord of the Earth'.
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Tlauixcalpantecuhtli
(Maya)God of the dawn. Lord of the planet Venus.
(Aztec)Lord of the house of dawn. The morning star Venus.
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Tlazolteotl
(Aztec)Goddess of filth. Dirt Goddes. Lady of Witches. Goddess of the cresent Moon. Earth and Mother Godddess. Goddess of sex. Goddess of physical love, fertility, death. Goddess of lust and sexual guilt. Was also known as Tlaelquarni, "cleansing" goddess and Tlacolteutl (she had four aspects; four sisters: Tiacapan, Teicu, Tlaco and Xocutzin).
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Tohil
(Maya) The god of fire.
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Tonantzin
(Aztec) The goddess of motherhood.
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Tonatiuh
(Aztec)Pilzintecutli. Royal Lord. Ruler of fate. Sun-god. God of warriors who died in battle and women who died in childbirth.
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To'nenile
(Navajo) The rain god.
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True Jaguar
(Maya) See Jaguar Night.
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Tsentsa
(Huron) The good Creator-Twin.
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Tsichtinako
The female spirit of the Acoma Indian creation myth.
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Tunkan Ingan
(Dakota) Sex god.
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Tzakol
(Maya)Sky God.
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Tzitzimime
(Aztec)Stellar God.
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Uchtsiti
The Acoma Indian creator of the world; Father of the Gods.
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Ueuecoyotl
(Aztec)God of sex and irresponsible gaiety. His name means "Old, Old Coyote".
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Uitzilopochtli
(Aztec)-God of the sun.
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Ukat
(Yana) Goddess of good luck.
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Unk
(Lakota) Goddess ancestor of all evil beings. She also created fish.
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Urcaguary
(Inca)God of underground treasures.
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Viracocha/Huiracocha
(Inca)The Creator. Foam of the lake. Great God. God of the sun, storm, lightning, oracles, languages, moral codes, rain, water, fertility.The supreme god. He created mankind, was disappointed with their actions and destroyed them. He re-created them, but this time created the sun and moon also so that they could live in the light. He then created mountains, rivers, animals so that all could have the means to exist.
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Voltan
(Maya)God of the earth.
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Wah-Kah-Nee
(Chinook) The Chinook people were once struck with a terrible endless winter. They were completely ice-bound with no relief in sight, and so the people began to fear for their survival for they would soon have no food. A council was called, and the elders recalled that endless winter resulted from the killing of a bird. Each person was asked if he or she had been guilty of such a crime. Everyone denied it. But the children pointed to a little girl who, crying, confessed that she had struck a bird with a stone, and it had died. The Chinook dressed the girl in the finest garments and exposed her on a block of ice as an offering to the winter spirits. Almost immediately a thaw ensued and summer came with a rush. Now the people could gather food again. Nearly a year later, when the winter returned, the Chinook saw a block of ice containing the girl's body and fetched it to shore. Miraculously, the girl revived and afterward lived among them as a sacred being, able to walk unprotected, even barefoot, through the winter and to communicate with its spirits.
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Wakan-Tanka
(Sioux) A collective union of the gods.
(Dakota) The Supreme Deity.
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White Buffalo Woman
(Oglala) This sacred woman brought secret knowledge to the Oglala. It was said that she first appeared to two young men as a white-clad lady whose clothing was lavishly embroidered with porcupine quills in exquisite patterns. One of the young men was overtaken by lust, but the second recognized that she was no earthly woman. The first, although warned, could not contain himself; he rushed open-armed toward the woman. She smiled, and a soft white cloud descended to cover their embrace. When it passed, the woman stood alone with the young man's skeleton at her feet. Smiling, she told the second man that the dead man had been awarded just what he sought. She instructed the man to return to his village and set his people to building a huge sacred tent. Then she entered the village, and the people were enraptured by her presence. Walking seven times around the central fire, she spoke to them, giving them a bag containing a sacred pipe and teaching them the ceremonies that went with these objects. She reminded them of the mysteries of their mother, the earth. Urging them always to honor her, she disappeared in the shape of a white buffalo.
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Windigo (Whitiko,Weendigo, Witigo, Wehtiko)
(Ojibwa, Chippewa, Algonquin) A race of giant cannibals who feed upon other human beings in the winter when food is scarce.
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Winonah
(Ojibwa) She was the daughter of the great goddess Nokomis. Winonah was a virgin mother who was raped four times by the same manitou or spirit. It happened that she was in the forest picking berries one day, and overtaken with a need to urinate, she forgot the warning that women should never face west while making water. When the manitou saw her vagina, he took form and had intercourse with her immediately. Through this spirit-union, she not only acquired magical powers of fertility and longevity, but also gave birth to four heroic sons.
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Wisagatcak
(Cree) The Trickster god.
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Xaman Ek
(Maya)Guide of the merchants. God of the North Star. Protector and guide of merchants and traders. God of business, peace, plenty.
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Xibalba
(Maya)Xibalbay. The realm of the dead.
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Xilonen
(Aztec)The HairyOne. Maize Goddess.
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Xipe Totec
(Aztec)-The god of springtime renewal and nocturnal rain. God of flowers. God of vegetation. His ceremonies were marked by human sacrifices. The victims were pierced with arrows so that their blood flooded the ground like a fertilizing rain. Then their hearts were torn out and, finally, they were flayed. People who had certain skin diseases wore the skin of the tortured for 20 days in order to be cured. Perhaps because of the yellow skins worn by the penitents, Xipe Totec was the god of goldsmiths.
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Xiuhcoatl
(Aztec)Fire-snake and the personification of drought and scorched earth.
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Xiuhtecuhtli
(Aztec)-Also known as Otontecuhtli or Huehueteotl. God of fire. Depicted as an old bearded man who carried a brazier on his head in which burned incense. He was the god of the hearth. As the god of fire he was also the god of the sun and of volcanoes.Xiuhtecuhtli was associated with peppers, symbols of the life force. The pine, from which torches are made, was his tree.
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Xiuhtecutli
(Aztec)Xiuhtecuhtli. He is the personification of light in the darkness, warmth in coldness, and life in death. God of light and fire.
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Xmucane
(Maya) The goddess of childbirth. Wife of Xpiyacoc and mother of One Hunahpu and Seven Hunahpu.
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Xochipili
(Aztec) The brother and consort of Xochiquetzal, associated with Xipe Totec and Cinteotl. God of flowers. God of sport. God of dance. God of games. God of beauty. God of love. God of youth.
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Xochiquetzal
(Aztec) The goddess of weavers who was also responsible for fertility, childbirth, flowers, singing and dancing. She was (like the Roman Flora) a deity of sexual license as well. Marigolds were her favorite flower, but she loved every plant and every creature. Much loved by Aztec women, she was honored with little pottery figurines that showed her with feathers in her hair; these are still frequently unearthed in Mexico. In some legends, this goddess was the only female survivor of the great flood that destroyed the world preceding this one. With a man, she escaped the torrent in a small boat. Faced with the prospect of repopulating the world, they set to work as soon as the flood receded. But all of their children were born mute. Finally a pigeon magically endowed them with language, but every child received a different tongue so that each was unable to communicate with the others.
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Xocotl
(Aztec)God of fire and of the stars.
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Xolotl
(Aztec)The Animal. Lord of the evening Star. Lord of the Underworld. God of lightning who guides the dead to the Mictlan. Lord of the evening star and personification of Venus. God of monsters, magicians, twins.
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Xpiyacoc
(Maya) The god of marriage, husband to Xmucane and father of One Hunahpu and Seven Hunahpu, mighty warriors who were experts in pokatok and never lost a game.
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Xpuch and Xtah
(Maya) According to legend, the world's first prostitutes.
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Yacatecuhtli
(Aztec)Yiacatecuhtli. Yiacatecuhtli. God of travelling merchants.
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Yaluk
(Maya) Chief of the lightning gods.
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Yebaad
(Navajo) The female leader of the gods.
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Yeba Ka
(Navajo) The male leader of the gods.
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Yeitso
(Navajo) The child of the sun. A giant in Navajo legend.
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Yemanja (Imanje)
(Brazil) She is the ocean goddess of the crescent moon. Goddess of the sea. On New Year's Eve, at midnight, those who love Yemanja go to a beach and light a candle in her name. Then, little boats constructed of flowers are set adrift on the waves. If they are taken out to the sea by Yemanja, a good year will come. if they are refused and thrown back onto the sand, it will be a bad year.
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Yemaya (Imanje)
(Caribbean) Goddess of the deep sea.
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Yiacatecuhtli
(Mexico) God of merchants.
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Yolkai Estsan
(Navajo) The sister of the turquoise-sky goddess Estsanatlehi, she was a Navaho moon goddess. Called "white shell woman" because she was made from abalone, Yolkai Estsan ruled the dawn and the ocean; she was also creator of fire and maize.
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Yum Kaax
(Maya)Forest Lord. Lord of the harvest fields. Lord of the woods. God of maize in particular and of agriculture in general. Personifies perfect male beauty.
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Zaramama
(Peru) This "grain mother" was occasionally replicated in her own fields in the form of strangely shaped ears of corn or ears that joined in multiple growths. Sometimes these goddess images were dressed as human women in a robe and shawl with a silver clasp; or they were created from precious metals or stone. Sometimes, Zaramama came to earth in deformed cornstalks, which were hung by her followers on willow trees; festive dances were held around the willows, then the cornstalks were burned (assuring a plentiful supply of corn) while the people drank fermented corn beer and ate the meat of sacrificed llamas, whose blood was used to anoint their faces.
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Zipaltonal
(Nicaragua) She was the goddess who made everything on earth. She lived in the east, where souls of the chosen went after death; souls of evildoers were confined to beneath her surface.
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Zotz
(Maya)Zotzilaha. Bat God of caves. Patron of the Zotzil Indians in Chiapas (Mexico) near the Pacific Ocean.
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