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Native American Gods A-C

Aakuluujjusi
The great creator mother among the Inuit people.
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Ab Kin Zoc
(Maya)Ppiz Hiu Tec. God of poetry.
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Abaangui
(Guarani Indian) God who cut off his huge nose, which then flew into the sky and became the moon.
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Ac Yanto
(Maya)God of white men.
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Acan
(Maya)God of wine.
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Acat
(Maya/Aztec)God of tatooers, life.
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Aclla
This was the name given to the sacred sun virgins among the Incas. In times of dire emergencies they willingly sacrificed their lives to appease the gods.
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Acna
(Maya/Mexico) Mother goddess associated with the moon. Patron of childbirth. Also known as Akna.
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Acolnahuacatl
(Aztec)Underworld God.
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Acolmiztli
(Aztec)Underworld God.
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Acuecucyoticihuati
(Aztec/Mexico) Goddess of the ocean. Closely associated with Chalchiuhtlicue. Aztec women appeal to her as they go into labor. Also: Acuecueyotl.
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Adamisil Wedo
(Haiti) Water goddess. Also known as Si Adaman.
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Adlivun
(Eskimo) The home of Sedna, goddess of the sea. This is where the dead are purified before continuing on to the Land of the Moon.
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Agaman Nibo
(Haiti) Goddess of the dead. Mother of Baron Samedi, father and chief of the gods of the dead and cemeteries.
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Aguara
(Tunpa) The fox-god who gave the carob tree to the people.
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Agwe
(Haiti) Vodun (voodoo) goddess. A manifestation of Yemanja. (Agwe is also a male deity.)
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Agweta
(Haiti) Sea goddess. Daughter of Agwe.
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Ah Bolom Tzacab
(Maya)Ah Bolon Dz'acab. The leaf-nosed god. God of agriculture.
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Ah Cancum
(Maya)God of hunting.
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Ah Chun Caan
(Maya)Tutelary deity.
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Ah Chuy Kak
(Maya)Fire Destroyer. War god.
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Ah Ciliz
(Maya)God of solar eclipses.
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Ah Cun Can
(Maya)Serpent Charmer. War god.
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Ah Cuxtal
(Maya)God of birth.
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Ah Hulneb
(Maya)God of war.
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Ah Kin
(Maya)Ah Kinchil. He of the Sun. Sun god. Controls drought and disease.
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Ah Kumix Uinicob
(Maya)Attendant Water Gods.
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Ah Mun
(Maya)God of maize.
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Ah Muzencab
(Maya)Bee Gods.
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Ah Patnar Uinicob
(Maya)Attendant Water Gods.
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Ah Peku
(Maya)God of thunder.
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Ah Puch
(Maya)Ahpuch. Lord of Death. Barebones. Hunahau or Hunhau. Rules Mitnal. God of death and the personification of disaster and darkness. God of childbirth.
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Ah Tabai
(Maya)Hunting God.
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Ah Uaynih
(Guatemala) Goddess of sleep. She causes males to fall asleep.
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Ah Uincir Dz'acab
(Maya)God of healing.
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Ah Uuc Ticab
(Maya)Chthonic deity.
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Ah Wink-ir Masa
(Guatemala) Nature goddess. Protector of wild animals, especially deer.
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Ahau Chamahez
(Maya)Medicine God.
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Ahau-Kin
(Maya)Ahau Kin. Lord of the Sun Face. Sun god. Jaguar God. Lord of the underworld.
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Ahmakiq
(Maya)God of agriculture.
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Ahnt Alis Pok'
(Mexico) Goddess, two feet tall, who lives with her mother Ahnt Kai'.
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Ahnt Kai'
(Mexico) Goddess of women and children. Daughter of Koo-mah'mm hahs-ay' tahm(First Woman). She flies at night and lives above the peak of Tiburon mountain. She is the teacher of singing and dancing, and tells the women and children when to do the Fish Dance. She heals snake bites. Equivalent to Athena (Greek), Kuan Yin (Far East) and Estsanatlehi (North America).
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Ahuic
(Aztec/Mexico) Goddess of the running water in rivers, streams, and waves on the beach. A manifestation of Chalchiuhtlicue.
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Ahulane
(Maya)The Archer. War god.
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Aida Wedo
(Haiti) Goddess of the rainbow and fresh water who determines human destiny. Followers offer sacrifices to her before their marriage. Her husband is Damballa, god of rivers and springs, and they both materialize as snakes. Also known as Aida Cuedo, Aido Wedo, Ayida, Ayida Cueddo.
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Ajbit
(Maya) One of the 13 gods who created the people; he assisted in the actual creating.
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Ajtzak
(Maya)One of the thirteen Gods who created human beings.
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Akewa
The sun goddess of the Toba tribe of Argentina.
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Akhushtal
(Maya)Goddess of childbirth.
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Akycha
(Eskimo) Sun god of the Alaskan Eskimo.
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Alaghom Naom Tzentel
Ancient Maya goddess of thought and intellect. Also known as Alaghom Naum, Ixtat Ix.
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Alignak
(Eskimo) God of the moon, storms, earthquakes and tides.
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Alom
(Maya) God of the sky. One of the 7 gods who assisted in the creation of the world.
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Amimitl
(Aztec)God of lakes and fish hunters.
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Angpetu Wi
(Dakota) The sun god.
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Aningan
(Eskimo) Moon god. Called Igaluk in Alaska.
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Apozanolotl
(Aztec/Mexico) A form of Chalchiuhtlicue, represented by foam, suds, or white-capped waves on the water surface, suggesting the virtue of purity.
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Apu Punchau
(Inca)Head of the day. Sun God.
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Asintmah
The first woman according to the Athabascans (AmerIndian), who was responsible for the birth of animal life on earth.
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Atabei
(Caribbean) Earth goddess in Cuba. Also known as Attabeira, Apito, Siella, Suimado, Mamona, Guacarapita, Liella, Guimazoa, Iella.
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Atahensic
(Iroquois) The sky goddess who fell to the earth at the beginning of creation.
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Atl
(Aztec)God of water.
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Atlacamani
(Aztec/Mexico) Goddess of ocean storms.
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Atlacoya
(Aztec/Mexico) Goddess of drought.
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Atlatonin
(Aztec/Mexico) One of the names for the Aztec mother goddess.
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Atlaua
(Aztec)Atlahua. Water God. Lord of the waters. God of fishermen.
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Auchimalgen
A Chilean moon goddess.
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Auilix
(Maya) The god of dawn.
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Ayauhteotl
(Aztec/Mexico) Goddess of fog and mist in the early morning or at night. She is associated with fame and vanity.
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Ayizan
(Haiti) Goddess that protects the market place, public places, roads, doorways, and gates. She is seen as a serpent and is represented by a palm leaf. Also known as Ayizan Velequete.
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Bacabs
(Maya)Gods of the four winds, the four directions. Four protective deities.Cauac, Ix, Kan, and Mulac.
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Bachué
The ancestor goddess of the Chibcha of South America. She mated with her son to produce the human race.
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Backlum Chaam
(Maya)God of male sexuality.
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Balam
(Maya)The Deities who protect people in their daily lives. Protectors of the community against external threats.
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Bikeh Hozho
(Navajo) The personification of speech, who appears in the Navajo creation myth in human-like form.
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Bitol
(Maya)Sky God. One of the seven Gods who created the world and the humans.
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Bochica
(Chibcha) The supreme sun god.
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Bolontiku
(Maya)A group of chthonic deities of the underworld.
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Breath of Wind
(Iroquois) The daughter of Atahensic, and the mother of Ioskeha and Tawiscara.
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Buluc Chabtan
(Maya)God of war to whom humans were sacrificed. He is the so-called 'God F'.
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Cabaguil
(Maya)Heart of the Sky. One of the seven Gods who assisted in the creation of the world and of mortals.
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Cacoch
(Maya)Creator God.
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Cakulha
(Maya) Subordinate to Yaluk, and ruler of the lesser lightning bolts.
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Camaxtli
(Maya)God of fate.
(Aztec)Mixcoatl. God of war, hunting, and fate, and creator of fire. He is one of the four Gods who created the world.
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Camozotz
(Maya) The bat god.
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Caprakan
(Maya)God of earthquakes and mountains.
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Ca-the-ña
(Mohave) Goddess of love (the "Mohave Venus"). She presides over fertility in humans and animals.
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Cauac
(Maya)One of the four Bacabs. Cauac is associated with the south. His color is red.
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Cavillaca
(Peru) The myth: Coniraya, the moon god, is said to have shaped his sperm into the likeness of a fruit which Cavillaca, a virgin goddess, unwittingly ate, thereby becoming pregnant; she bore a son. She called all the gods together and demanded to know who was the boy's father. When no one owned up to it she placed the boy on the ground whereupon he crawled toward Coniraya. Cavillaca, ashamed because the moon god was the poorest and seediest of the gods, grabbed her son and ran away. When she reached the coast of Peru she changed her son and herself to rocks.
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Centeotl
(Aztec)Centeocihuatl. Cinteotl. Maize God.
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Centzonuitznaua
(Aztec)Gods of the southern stars.
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Chac
(Maya)Chac Mol. Long-nose. Rain and vegetation God. God of fertility and agriculture. One of the Bacabs. Personification of the east. He is also known as Ah Hoya ("he who urinates"), Ah Tzenul ("he who gives food to others"), and Hopop Caan ("he who lights up the sky").
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Chac Uayab Xoc
(Maya)Fish God.
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Chakwaina Okya
(Zuni) Goddess of childbirth.
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Chalchiuhtlatonal
(Aztec)God of water.
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Chalchihuitlicue
(Aztec) She unleashed the flood (to punish the wicked) that the destroyed the fourth world (according to the Aztecs, we are in the fifth world). She ruled over all the waters of the earth; oceans, rivers, rain, etc. The wife/sister of Tlaloc. The goddess of running water, and of fertility; she was also associated with marriage. Goddess of the East. Precious Green Lady. Precious Jewel Lady. Precious jade skirt. Vegetation Goddess. Goddess of storms, youthful beauty, whirlpools, spring growth, love, flowers, spirits, streams, sea, springs. Protectress of newborn babies and marriages.
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Chalchiutotolin
(Aztec)God of pestilence.
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Chalmecacihuilt
(Aztec)Goddess of the underworld.
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Chalmecatl
(Aztec)God of the underworld.
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Chamer
(Maya)God of death.
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Chantico
(Aztec)Goddess of hearth fires and volcanic fires, home, fertility. Her name means 'she who dwells in the house'.
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Chaob
(Maya)The four wind Gods, each associated with one of the cardinal directions.
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Chasca
(Inca)Goddesses who cared for princesses, girls and flowers.
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Chibiabos
(Algonquin) Brother of Nanabush.
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Chibirias
(Maya)Earth Goddess.
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Chiccan
(Maya)A group of four rain Gods, associated with the four cardinal directions. They create rain clouds from the deep lakes in which they reside.
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Chicomecoatl
(Aztec) A maize goddess. She appeared in multiple forms; a maiden adorned with water flowers, a young woman whose embrace brought death, and a mother carrying the sun as a shield. The goddess of plenty, she was the female aspect of the corn.
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Chicomexochtli
(Aztec)God of painters.
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Chiconahui
(Aztec)Hearth Goddess. Guardian of the household.
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Chiconahuiehecatl
(Aztec)Creator God.
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Chie
(AmerIndian) A fun-loving Chibcha goddess who advised the people to live a life of merrymaking, joy and laughter instead of just obeying the laws. This teed off Bochia (god of law) who turned her into an owl.
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Chirakan
(Maya)Goddess who was brought to the world when four of the gods who created the world split themselves up and became four additional beings.
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Cihuacoatl
(Aztec)Chihucoatl. Earth and Mother Goddess. Patroness of birth and of women who died while giving birth. Goddess of childbirth. When weeping and wailing through the night she was forecasting wars and misery.
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Cinteotl
(Aztec)God of corn. Corn Spirit.
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Cipactli
(Aztec) The Earth Monster to whom Tezcatlipoca sacrificed his foot.
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Cit-Bolon-Tum
(Maya)God of medicine.
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Cit Chac Coh
(Maya)War God.
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Citlalatonac
(Aztec)Creator God.
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Citlalicue
(Aztec)Citlalinicue. Ilamatecuhtli. Star Garment. Creator Goddess.
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Ciucoatl
(Aztec)Ciuacoatl. Goddess of the earth.
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Ciuteoteo
(Aztec)Ciuateoteo. Spirits of the underworld.
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Cizin
(Maya)God of death.
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Coatlicue
(Aztec)1. THE MYTH OF COATLICUE (Earth Monster): In the darkness and chaos before the Creation, the female Earth Monster swam in the waters of the earth devouring all that she saw. When the gods Quetzalcoatl and Tezcatlipoca decided to impose form upon the Earth, they changed themselves into serpents and struggled with the Earth Monster until they broke her in two. Coatlicue's lower part then rose to form the heavens and her upper part descended to form the earth. Coatlicue has an endless, ravenous appetite for human hearts and will not bear fruit unless given human blood. One day while performing penance and sweeping at Coatepec, the chaste and pious Coatlicue discovers a ball of feathers. Wanting to save the precious feathers, Coatlicue places them in her waistband. However, when she later looks for the ball of feathers, it is gone. Unknown to her at the time, the feathers had impregnated her with the seed of Huitzilopochtli. Gradually Coatlicue grows in size until her sons, the Centzon Huitznahua, notice that she is with child . Enraged and shamed, they furiously demand to know the father. Their elder sister, Coyolxauhqui, decides that they must slay their mother. The news of her children's intentions terrifies the pregnant goddess, but the child within her womb consoles Coatlicue, assuring her that he is already aware and ready. Dressed in the raiment of warriors, the Centzon Huitznahua follow Coyolxauhqui to Coatepec. When her raging children reach the crest of the mountain, Coatlicue gives birth to Huitzilopochtli fully armed. Wielding his burning weapon, known as the Xiuhcoatl or Turquoise Serpent, he slays Coyolxauhqui and, cut to pieces, her body tumbles to the base of Coatepec.
2. Another MYTH of COATLICUE: "Mother of Gods": Earth goddess. Coatlicue conceived Quetzalcoatl, God of creation, after keeping in her bosom a ball of hummingbird feathers (the soul of a fallen warrior) that dropped from the sky. Quetzalcoatl, with Tezcatlipoca, pulled her down from the heavens, and in the form of great serpents, ripped her into two pieces to form the earth and sky. Coatlicue was known as "The Mother of Gods", "The Devourer of Filth", "Our Grandmother". She wears a skirt made of braided serpents secured by another serpent and a necklace of human hands and hearts with a human skull. Her feet and hands are adorned with claws. Coatlicue was seen as an insatiable deity feasting on the corpses of men. Her breasts are depicted as hanging flaccid from nursing. Also known as Teteoinan, (Teteo Inan), "The Mother of Gods", gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli (the Sun god). She was also known as Toci, "Our Grandmother", and known as Cihuacoatl, patron of women who die in childbirth. Cihuacoatl was transformed into modern Mexican culture as La Llorona, "The Weeping Woman", said to carry the body of a dead child and weep at night in city streets.
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Cochimetl
(Aztec)Cocochimetl. God of merchants and commerce.
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Cocijo
(Zapotec) The rain god.
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Cocomama
(AmerIndian) A goddess of health and happiness. Originally a promiscuous woman cut in half by jealous lovers; her body grew into the first coca bush, whose leaves men were not suppose to chew until they had satisfied a woman's sexual needs.
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Colel Cab
(Maya)Earth Goddess.
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Colop U Uichkin
(Maya)Sky God.
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Copil
(Aztec) Son of Malinalxochi.
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Coyolxauhqui
(Aztec) Goddess of the moon. One of the four hundred of Coatlique's children killed by Huitzilopochtli, who when he saw his mother's grief at this particular death (she did not mourn the others), cut off Coyolxauhqui's head and threw it high into the sky where it became the moon, so that his mother might take comfort nightly from the sight of her daughter in the sky.
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Coyopa
(Maya) Brother of Cakulha, and ruler of the sound of thunder.
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Coyote or Old Man
(American Indian)Also called Inktomi by some tribes. The "trickster" who assists in one aspect or other of some American Indian creation myths.
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Cum Hau
(Maya)God of death.
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