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Native American Gods D-I

Dagwanoenyent
(Seneca) Personification of a whirlwind.
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Deohako
(Seneca) Collective name of the three daughters of the Earth Mother. They are the guardians and spirits of corn, beans, and squash.
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Djigonsasee
A heroine of the Ontario Hurons, Djigonasee was the mother of the peacebringer Deganawada, founder of the Iroquois League (Six Nations): Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora. Like many mothers of heroes, Djigonasee was a virgin when her son was born. A herald from beyond this world announced the birth.
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Dzalarhons
(Haida) The volcano goddess of the Haida tribe.
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Ee-loolth
(Duwamish) A mountain goddess.
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Ehecatl
(Aztec) God of the wind. He brought love to the human race when he aroused desire in the maiden Mayahuel. Their love was made manifest by a beautiful tree which grew upon the spot where they landed on earth.
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Eithinoha
(Iroquois) The earth; her name means "our mother".
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Ek Ahau
(Maya)War God.
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Ekchuah
(Maya)Ek Chuah. God of war. Patron of merchants.
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Esceheman
(Arapaho) Grandmother earth goddess.
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Eschetewuarha
(Chamacoco) She is the Great Spirit's wife and the mother of the rain.
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Estsanatlehi
(Navaho) The sky goddess, wife of the sun. The twin sister of Yolkai Estsan, wife of the moon. The "woman who recreates herself". The most respected Navajo deity. She is the mother of the twins Monster Slayer and Born for Water, who rid the earth of monsters. The first humans are said to have been created from skin rubbed from her body.
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Evaki
(AmerIndian) The goddess of night and day. She had a pot with a lid; when she closed the lid the sun was left outside (night), when she took the lid off the pot, the sun could be seen (day).
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Ewauna
(Coquille) Creator goddess.
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Gaoh
(Iroquois) Master of the winds.
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Gawaunduk
(Ojibwa) She was a young woman given in marriage to a respected elder of the tribe, who was more than three times her age. She went obediently, if unhappily, feeling her life would be less satisfying than if she had found a love-mate her own age. As the years passed and she had many children by the old man, her heart softened towards him. When he grew sick at age 85, Gawaunduk cared for him tenderly and nursed him back to health. He recovered and lived another 15 years. Then, at 100 years old, he died quietly in his sleep. She grieved so at his grave that she died of that grief and they were buried together. Mists that rise from spruce forests are said to be her tears as she mourns for him.
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Geezhigo-Quae
(Ojibwa) She was the sky mother, a manitou (great spirit) who dwelt in the heavens and watched over her people from there. She was the creator of humanity; she created the earth by descending into the primal soup to find land under the waves and fashioning it into the hills and valleys and the mountain ranges of the earth.
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Gendenwitha
(Iroquois) The morning star (means "she who brings the day"). Her story tells of the time when the great hunter Sosondowah was stalking a supernatural elk. The hunt brought him to the heavens, where the goddess Dawn trapped him as her doorkeeper. But he did not remain faithful to his duties; down on earth he saw Gendenwitha (a mortal woman) and daily left his duties to court her. While Dawn was busy coloring the sky, the hunter was singing to his beloved: in spring as a bluebird; in summer, as a blackbird; in autumn, as a hawk. And it was as a hawk that he tried to carry Gendenwitha to heaven with him. But the jealous Dawn turned the woman into a star and set Gendenwitha just above Dawn's door, where she shines today as the morning star.
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Genetaska
(Iroquois) She was a human woman so wise that squabbles among her people were brought to her for settlement. Genetaska was always impartial and fair, but one day she fell in love with a defendant and then married him. This ruined her reputation for impartiality and her "office" of mediator was abolished.
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Ghanan
(Maya)God of agriculture.
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Gitche Manitou
The Great Spirit, the All-Father.
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Glispa
(Navajo) She learned the healing chant (Hozoni) and its rituals from her lover, a leader of the snake people of the lower world. Back on earth, she tried to teach the song of beauty to her brother, but he was not as fast a learner as she and had trouble remembering the elaborately beautiful song. By the use of magic she finally taught him; when she returned to the lower world, the Navajo were left with the gift of healing.
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Gluskap
(Algonquin) The creator force. Also Glooscap.
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Godasiyo
(Tuscarora) It is said that at the beginning of time, all the people spoke the same language. The heroine Godasiyo was a chief in the biggest village. One day, Godasiyo's favorite dog gave birth to seven puppies, the last-born of which was the cutest puppy you have ever seen. This magical puppy was so cute that Godasiyo's people grew envious. They began to argue violently for possession of the dog. Godasiyo invented canoes and ordered those of her people who were still friendly into them. She wanted them to travel to a new place, where they could establish a new village and live in peace with the adorable puppy. But even as they pepared to embark arguments began about which canoe the chief and her puppy should ride in. Godasiyo then invented an outrigger, so she could ride between the canoes. But even this was not good enough. The migrating people reached a place where the river divided and began to argue furiously about which way to go. During the argument, the chief and her dog were accidentally thrown into the water and drowned. But almost immediately they were reborn, she as a huge sturgeon, the puppy as a little whitefish. When the people tried to comment on this miracle, they found they could no longer understand each other. Because of the conflict over possession of a puppy, the many human languages were born.
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Great Seahouse
(Maya) See Jaguar Night.
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Guabancex
(Caribbean) The goddess of storms, wind, and water. Her messenger goddess was Guantuava.
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Gucumatz
(Maya)Kucumatz. Creator God. Serpent God. God of agriculture and civilization.
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Gukumatz
(Maya)Sky God. One of the seven Gods who created the world and the humans.
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Gunnodoyak
(Iroquois) A young hunter (mortal) who was adopted by Hino and brought up to heaven.
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Gyhldeptis
(Tlingit/Haida) The Tlingit and Haida tribes of Alaska considered her a kindly forest goddess.
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Hacauitz
(Maya) The god of the mountains.
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Hacha'kyum
(Maya)God of real people.
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Hamedicu
(Huron) The High God.
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Hanghepi Wi
(Dakota) Moon god.
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Hastseoltoi
(AmerIndian) Goddess of hunting. Wife of the war god.
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Heng
(Huron) The spirit of thunder.
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Hino (Hinu, Heno)
(Iroquois) The sky god and the spirit of thunder. He killed the water serpent who lived in the Great Lakes.
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Hisakitaimisi
(Creek) "Controller of Life".
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Hotoru
(Pawnee) Wind god.
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Huehuecoyotl
(Aztec)Ueuecoyotl. Trickster God. God of gaiety, physical sex, irrational fun.
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Huehueteotl
(Aztec)The Old God. God of fire. Torquoise lord. Patron of warriors and kings. God of domestic and spiritual fire, ritual, the calender. The alternative name of the Aztec god Xiuhtecutli.
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Huitaca
(Chibcha) The moon goddess, wife of Bochica. Also the goddess of indulgence.
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Huitzilopochtli
(Aztec) The god of war and the protector of the city, was the blazing midday sun. He was depicted with hummingbird feathers on his head and left leg, his face black, and brandishing a serpent made of turquoise. The story goes that Coatlicue, the mother of Coyolxauhqui (night) and of four hundred stellar divinities was praying when a bunch of feathers fell from heaven. She placed them in her bodice and, shortly afterwards, discovered she was pregnant. Her children reproached her for this belated pregnancy and discussed killing her. But Huitzilopochtli emerged fully armed from her womb, wearing blue armor and carrying a blue lance and the "turquoise serpent", and massacred his brothers and sisters.
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Huixtocihuatl
(Aztec)Uixtochihuatl. Fertility Goddess.
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Hummingbird
(Maya) See Jaguar Night.
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Hun Hunahpu
(Maya)Fertility God.
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Hunab Ku
(Maya)Supreme God. Creator God. God of the gods.
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Hunahpu
(Maya)Creator God. Sun God. One of the two heroes (with Xbalanque) who contested against the gods in a game of pokatok, the Mayan equivalent of basketball combined with soccer. In the regular games, the losing team was sacrificed to the gods!
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Hunahpu Utiu
(Maya)One of the thirteen Gods who created human beings.
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Hunahpu-Gutch
(Maya)One of the thirteen Gods who created human beings.
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Hunhau
(Maya)Hunahau. Chief of demons and ruler of Mitnal.
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Hun Pic Tok
(Maya)War God.
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Hurakan
(Maya)Huracan. Hurrican. Triple heart of the universe. God of wind and storm. Creator god. God of the whirlwind, hurricanes, thunder, spiritual illumination.
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Iatiku and Nautsiti
(Acoma) The sisters who created man.
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Idlirvirisong
(Eskimo) The demonic cousin of the sun.
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Ilamatecuhtli
(Aztec)Mother Goddess.
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Illapa
(Inca)Storm and Weather God. God of thunder and lightning.
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Ilyap'a
(Inca) The weather god. Pictured as a man in the sky with a sling. He made rain fall by breaking with his slingshot a pitcher of water held by his sister. The crack of his sling was thunder, the shot was the lightning bolt.
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Inti
(Inca)Sun God. God of fertility and crops.
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Ioskeha
(Iroquois) Creator of the first man and woman.
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Ipalnemohuani
(Aztec) The supreme deity. Also called Tloque Nahuaque.
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Isakakate
(Crow) The Supreme Being.
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Itzamná
(Maya) God of The sky. Father of the Gods. Creator of mankind. Lord of knowledge. Moon-god. Personified the East, the rising Sun, light, life. God of healing,drawing, letters, crops, fertility, water, regeneration, medicine. The most important deity in the Maya pantheon, Itzamna was the son of the creator god Hunab, and was lord of the heavens, and also lord of day and night. He was represented as a kindly old man, toothless with sunken cheeks and a pronounced nose. A cultural hero, he invented writing and books, established religious cermonies, and divided the land. He was entirely benevolent, never responsible for any destruction or disaster.
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Itzananohk`u
(Maya)God of Lacandon.
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Itzlacoliuhque
(Aztec)Obsidian knife god. God of darkness, terrible cold, volcanic eruptions, disaster.
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Itzli
(Aztec)Stone knife God. God of sacrifice.
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Itzpapalotl
(Aztec)Obsidian Knife Butterfly. Goddess of agriculture, fate, stars. She is mentioned as a dragon-like being.
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Ix Chebel Yax
(Maya)Goddess of weaving.
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Ixbalanque
(Maya)God of the moon, magic.
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Ixchel
(Maya)The Rainbow. Earth and Moon Goddess. Patroness of pregnant women. Goddess of childbirth, medicine, the Moon, pregnancy, floods, weaving, domestic arts.
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Ixchup
(Maya)Young Moon Goddess.
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Ixmucane
(Maya)One of the thirteen Gods who created human beings.
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Ixpiyacoc
(Maya)One of the thirteen Gods who created human beings.
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Ixtab
(Maya)Goddess of the noose and the gallows. Protector of those who committed suicide. Patroness of hunting and hanging.
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Ixtlilton
(Aztec)God of healing and medicine, as well as feasting and games.
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Ixtubtin
(Maya)Protectress of all jade cutters.
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Ixzaluoh
(Maya)Water Goddess.
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Iztaccihuatl
(Aztec)Mother Goddess.
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Iztacmixcohuatl
(Aztec) The mythical founder of the Aztec peoples.
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Celtic Gods and Goddesses , Egyptian Gods and Goddesses , Greek Gods and Goddesses , Middle Eastern Myth , Mythological Creatures , Native American Gods , Norse Gods , Roman Gods and Goddesses , Deities Correspondences

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