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Medicinal Herbs M-Z

Marjoram (Origanum onites)
Marjoram is a frequently used flavor enhancer that is also popular among herb fans. They believe that marjoram is useful for nausea, indigestion, heartburn, menstrual cramps, nervous tension and headache. It is also used to prevent seasickness and to help relieve generalized aches and pains.
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Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis)
Marshmallow is a frequently lauded and recommended herb for the relief of peptic ulcers, colitis and urinary tract conditions.
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Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca)
Here is an herb that has found favor with many women. They use it to regulate the menstrual cycle, to relieve menstrual cramps and to reduce or eliminate some of the symptoms associated with menopause. But motherwort is not for women only! Men and women alike have used this herb for nervous tension, respiratory congestion and the common cold.
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Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris)
According to many reports, the mugwort herb is very useful for a variety of problems. These include fatigue, arthritis, gout, indigestion and poor appetite. Mugwort also is believed to strengthen the urinary tract system and to cleanse the gastrointestinal system. Excessive doses may be hazardous.
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Mullein (Verbascum thapsus)
Mullein has a long history in herbal medicine, and it's not surprising. Countless people claim that it is the best thing available for the flu or common cold. Many others say they would use nothing else but mullein for abdominal cramps and swollen joints. In addition, mullein is said to enhance sinus health. The plant can be found throughout the eastern and central United States.
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Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha)
Even before myrrh was mentioned in the Bible, it already had established itself as a healing secret. Myrrh is believed to help when the stomach flu strikes. It also is used to combat fatigue, to balance and normalize the digestive tract and to relieve sinus complaints in many cases.
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Nettle (Urtica dioica)
Nettle, according to its many fans, can help to reduce fever and to relieve many of the symptoms associated with the common cold and hayfever. Some people say it helps their arthritis, while others claim it lowers blood sugar. In addition, nettle is gaining popularity as a weight-loss aid.
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Papaya (Carica papaya)
Papaya is not just a delicious tropical fruit. It's also known for its antacid properties. Herbalists say papaya contains a digestive enzyme that helps to relieve indigestion without causing side effects (like some synthetic antacids can).
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Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)
Parsley reportedly has strong diuretic properties that may benefit people who have kidney and bladder problems—including stones and gravel. It also is used for coughing, asthma, indigestion, menstrual cramps, gallstones and liver conditions. In addition, some herbalists believe that parsley can help to strengthen the circulatory system.
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Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata)
This beautiful plant is also a much-appreciated healing secret. For many herbalists, it's the preferred choice for anxiety, insomnia, and muscular tension or headaches associated with stress. When nerves are on edge, passion flower is a welcome remedy for many people.
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Pennyroyal (Hedeoma pulegioides)
Early native Americans knew all about the value of pennyroyal. They used it for pain, including the discomfort of menstrual cramps. Nowadays, pennyroyal is used most often to relieve the symptoms of the common cold and other respiratory ailments. Pennyroyal, it is said, helps coughing, reduces body temperature during a high fever and relieves premenstrual syndrome. Some people also claim that it promotes perspiration, making it useful in cleansing toxins from the system.
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Peppermint (Mentha piperita)
Peppermint is a popular herbal tea, but it also is available in leaf and capsule forms. No matter how it's used, peppermint has been said to relieve tension headaches, anxiety, insomnia, indigestion, heartburn, nausea and flatulence. Some herbalists claim it has antispasmodic qualities that make it useful for muscle and stomach cramps. In addition, peppermint is believed to help normalize and balance the entire system, helping the body maintain its self-healing abilities. Peppermint should not be used for prolonged periods without medical supervision.
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Plantain (Plantago major)
Common plantain has been recommended for many purposes, but its most common uses are in cases of diarrhea, hemorrhoids and intestinal colic. It grows throughout Europe and North America, except in extremely cold climates.
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Psyllium (Plantago psyllium)
It's no wonder that this herb has found favor as a remedy for constipation, hemorrhoids and other digestive troubles. Psyllium seeds are an incredibly rich source of bran, which we now know to be very beneficial to the gastrointestinal system. In addition, it is believed that psyllium can help to reduce the risk of heart disease by increasing the blood levels of "good cholesterol."
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Quince (Cydonia cydonia)
The fruit of the quince tree holds healing secrets! It is believed to help strengthen the gastrointestinal tract and to help patients recover from surgery and illness.
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Raspberry, European Red (Rubus idaeus)
The European red variety of rasperry leaves is believed to help relieve menstrual cramps and to facilitate childbirth. In addition, some herbalists claim it can enhance heart and blood vessel health.
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Raspberry, Wild Red (Rubus strigosus)
Wild red raspberry has several reported qualities that make it quite different from its European cousin. Wild red raspberry leaves are sometimes suggested for the relief of nausea, indigestion and bowel irregularity.
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Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)
Many herbalists rave about red clover, claiming that it is one of the best herbs for cleansing the bloodstream of toxins. Some say red clover also enhances a person's general health and well-being.
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Rose (Rosa species)
The flowers and hips (fruits) of different rose species have told their healing secrets to people all over the world and throughout the centuries. Rose hips, in particular, are a very popular and appreciated herbal remedy. People have used rose hips to help relieve stress and tension, and to enhance heart and blood vessel function. Rose hips are a good source of vitamin C. Some herbalists claim that rose hips can help to fight infection.
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Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)
In the 14th century, the Queen of Hungary began using rosemary. She was past the age of 70, but she found that rosemary helped to relieve her crippling arthritis and gout. At the same time, it seemed to rejuvenate her. In fact, it wasn't long before the Queen had a marriage proposal . . . from the King of Poland. The rejuvenation that the Queen claimed may have been due to rosemary's reported antioxidant properties. Antioxidants combat free radicals, which play a role in premature aging and several disease processes. Today, rosemary's most common uses are for kidney and bladder stones, coughing and the discomforts of the common cold.
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Rue (Ruta graveolens)
Here is another herb that has remained popular and widely used for centuries. Rue is frequently recommended for stomach and intestinal cramps, gas, the pain of arthritis and gout, dizziness, and some of the symptoms of menopause. Avoid large doses.
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Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius)
Safflower reportedly promotes sweating, so some people find it helpful at the onset of a cold or the flu. In addition, safflower is believed to help relieve nervous tension.
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Sage (Salvia officinalis)
Sage has come a long way over a long period of time. It began its herbal legacy as a repeller of evil spirits and vampires. Modern-day herbalists, however, claim that sage has more important work to do today. These herbalists recommend sage for a variety of complaints, including depression, nervousness, constipation, excessive perspiration and headaches. Sage is believed to help reduce the risk of blood clots and to enhance cardiovascular health. In addition, sage is widely use for virtually any kind of stomach condition. Avoid prolonged use or high doses.
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Sarsaparilla, Honduras (Smilax officinalis)
This variety of sarsaparilla has been recommended for rheumatism, water retention, edema and blood cleansing. Because it is said to induce sweating, sarsaparilla also is used early in the course of a cold or the flu. In addition, Honduras sarsaparilla is used by some Oriental herbalists to help relieve various urinary tract conditions.
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Sarsaparilla, Wild or American (Smilax ornata)
This variety of sarsaparilla is believed to help stomach ulcers heal more rapidly. Some people claim it also promotes tissue growth and repair.
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Sassafras (Sassafras officinale)
The healing secret of this herb is its reported value in clearing toxins out of the bloodstream. Some herbalists also claim that sassafras strengthens the liver, overcomes fatigue and acts as a diuretic to reduce the symptoms of water retention and edema.
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Savory, Summer (Satureja hortensis)
Summer savory is sometimes recommended for fatigue, respiratory congestion and various gastrointestinal discomforts.
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Savory, Winter (Satureja montana)
Winter savory has uses that are similar to those of summer savory, described above.
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Saw Palmetto (Serenoa serrulata)
Saw palmetto is used to relieve coughing and to reduce mucous accumulation in the head and nose. Many Germans attest to saw palmetto's value in reducing non-cancerous prostate enlargement. In addition, herbalists believe that saw palmetto has a tonic effect on both the male and female reproductive systems.
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Senna (Cassia species.)
Senna comes in a variety of types, and virtually all of them have one basic purpose: to help overcome constipation. Use in small doses, because the effect can be unexpectedly strong!
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Shepherd's Purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris)
Shepherd's purse may be suggested to help normalize bowel function, promote regularity and relieve menstrual cramps and low blood pressure.
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Skullcap (Scutellaria laterifolia)
Also spelled scullcap, this herb is a long-time favorite that is most commonly known as a natural tranquilizer. In addition to reportedly relieving nervous tension and insomnia, skullcap is believed to have antispasmodic properties. That is why many people use this herb for muscle pain and menstrual cramps.
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Slippery Elm Bark (Ulmus fulva)
The bark of the slippery elm tree is sometimes recommended for stomach ulcers, kidney ailments and hemorrhoids. In addition, it is used to normalize the bowel, whether the problem is constipation or diarrhea.
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Spearmint (Mentha spicata)
Spearmint is believed to be a useful remedy for fatigue. At the same time, it helps to relieve nervous tension and anxiety. Some herbalists recommend it for painful urination.
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Speedwell (Veronica officinalis)
Speedwell is widely used throughout the world and has a long tradition in herbal medicine. It has been used for migraines and most kinds of gastrointestinal troubles.
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Squawvine (Mitchella repens)
Early native Americans appreciated the reported ability of squawvine to put an end to insomnia. Today, this herb is also used for water retention and edema. It grows throughout the United States and Canada.
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Sticklewort (Agrimonia eupatoria)
Here is another herb with a list of uses that could go on for pages. But the primary applications for sticklewort include gallbladder, liver and kidney conditions.
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St. Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum)
This herb is believed to be very efficient at cleansing the bloodstream. It also has been recommended to help regulate the menstrual cycle. Avoid prolonged use or high doses.
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Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis odorata)
Herbalists sometimes use sweet cicely (alias wild myrrh) to reduce coughing. This herb is found as far north as Alaska and as far south as Georgia.
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Sweet Flag (Acorus calamus)
If you would like to know just about everything there is to know about sweet flag, read Walt Whitman's poem, "Calamus." This herb is often used in topical form for skin problems, but some people use it internally for fatigue and such digestive complaints as gas, heartburn, nausea and indigestion.
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Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)
Herbalists may recommend tansy as a cardiovascular tonic to strengthen and tone the heart, blood vessels and circulation. In addition, tansy is said to help rid the body of intestional parasites.
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Turmeric (Circuma longa)
This is more than a curry-like flavor enhancer. To herbalists and herb users, turmeric has healing secrets to tell. It is believed to help promote good liver function. Because of its reported anti-inflammatory properties, it has been used for arthritis.
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Uva-Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva ursi)
This herb with the odd-sounding name is actually a very old folk remedy. It is believed to have diuretic properties that have been used for people with water retention and urinary tract problems—especially bladder infections.
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Valerian (Valeriana officinalis)
Herbalists and students of herbal medicine are all familiar with the popular and widely used herb known as valerian. It is said to work like the prescription drug Valium, without Valium's side effects. Valerian's reported sedative qualities also have been used for  insomnia, premenstrual syndrome and pain. Avoid excessive doses of this potent herb.
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Vervain (Verbena officinalis)
Another popular and commonly used herb, vervain is sometimes recommended for fever, colds, shortness of breath, eczema and liver problems. Avoid prolonged or excessive use.
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Violet, Sweet (Viola odorata)
Sweet violet has been used for headaches and coughing. It is said to have antibiotic properties, too. Use sparingly.
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Wild Yam (Dioscorea villosa)
According to many herbalists, wild yam is a good sedative that can do double duty by relieving neuralgia and gas.
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Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
Almost everyone who enjoys the healing secrets of herbs makes sure that some yarrow is always available. This hard-working herb is said to have a soothing effect on irritated and inflamed mucous membranes. Some people claim it also has anti-inflammatory properties that make it useful for arthritis, gout and hemorrhoids.
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Yellow Dock (Rumex crispus)
Yellow dock may be the last herb on this list, but it certainly is not the least when it comes to healing secrets! This versatile herb and old-time remedy is used for mucous accumulation, bronchitis, emphysema and to help purify the blood and lymph glands. Some people also claim that it can enhance physical endurance. Because of its high vitamin A contact, yellow dock also is believed to benefit people who have night blindness.


 IndexA-LM-Z

Magickal Herbs , Herbal First Aid Kit , Scented Herbs , Medicinal Herbs , Trees
A Letter From Mom And Dad , An Open Letter to a Witch , Banner Links , Blessings , The Charges of the Gods , Crafts , Correspondences , Devotions , Dictionary , Goddess Months , Gods and Goddesses , Herbs , Invocations , Magickal Needs , Meditations , Metaphysical , Miscellanous Items , Oghams , Recipes , Redes and Laws , Rituals , Runes , Sitemap , Spells , Short Stories , Tarot  , Text Links , Webrings , What is Wicca? , What Law Enforcment Agencies Need To Know About Witchcraft