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Minor Gods and Demi Gods E-H

Ececheira
The personification of armistice or truce. She appeared at the Olympic games to ensure that there would be no hostilities.
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Efreisone
The female personification of a Greek ritual object: a branch of olive wood, twined with wool and hung with fruits, which was carried in festivals by children with two living parents.
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Eirene
One of the Horae; her name means peace.
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Eleos
The goddess of mercy.
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Empusa
Empousa. A spectre.
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Enipeus
River God.
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Enyalius
War god.
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Enyo
1.Enyo: A Greek goddess of war and waster of cities, sometimes depicted as the daughter of Ares. She appears covered in blood, and striking attitudes of violence.
2.Enyo ("horror"): One of the Graeae, the three 'old women'.
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Eos-dawn
Eos was the goddess of dawn, daughter of the Titans, Hyperion and Theia, and sister of Helios and Selene. She was the mother of the evening star Eosphorus (Hesperus), other stars, and the winds Boreas, Zephyrus and Notus. When she was caught in a tryst with Ares, Aphrodite cursed her with an insatiable desire for handsome young men. She most often appears winged or in a chariot drawn by four horses, one of them being Pegasus.
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Epimetheus
Personification of afterthought.
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Erato-passionate
The Muse of lyric poetry and mime, usually depicted holding a lyre.
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Erebus
Personification of primeval darkness.
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Eris-strife
Eris is the goddess of discord, evil, infatuation, mischief and strife and the daughter of Zeus and Hera. She is obsessed with bloodshed, havoc, and suffering. She calls forth war and her brother Ares carries out the action.
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Ersa
Goddess of dew.
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Eunomia
One of the Horae. Goddess of wise legislation and order.
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Euphrosyne
One of the Graces.
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Europa
Fertility Goddess.
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Eurus
God of the east wind, renewing and intelligence.
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Euryale
One of the Gorgons.
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Eurynome
The goddess of all creation, and ruled the Titans (with Ophion) before Cronus.
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Euterpe-rejoicing well
The Muse of lyric poetry and music.
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Ganymeda
Originally the goddess cupbearer to the gods who served ambrosia and nectar at Olympian feasts. She was later split in two; her name and her position as cupbearer were granted to Ganymede (see below) and her other attributes were transferred to Hebe.
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Ganymede
A mortal boy that was abducted by Zeus, given immortality and the job of cupbearer to the gods, and became Zeus' lover.
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Geras
Goddess of old age, she was the daughter of Nyx.
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Harmonia
Goddess of harmony and discord.
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Harpies
Goddesses of storms. Personifications of the storm winds. In earlier versions of Greek myth, Harpies were described as beautiful, winged maidens. Later they became winged monsters with the face of an ugly old woman and equipped with crooked, sharp talons.
Aello- Storm Swift.
Celaeno- The Dark.
Podarge- The Fleet foot.
Ocypete- The Swiftwing.
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Heliades
Aegiale, Aegle, and Aetheria.
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Helios-sun
He was the sun god, son of the Titans Hyperion and Theia and father of Phaëthon. Each morning he left a palace in the east and crossed the sky in a golden chariot, then returned along the river Oceanus, which girded the earth. God of riches, enlightment, victory and the sun.
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Hemera-sun
Representation of day; she was the daughter of Nyx and Erebus.
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Hespera
First Goddess of the dawn.
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Hesperides
Nymphs who live in a beautiful garden. Aegle, Arethusa, Erytheia and Hesperia.
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Hesperos
The goddess of evening and wife of Atlas.
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Hilaeira
Goddess of brightness.
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Himeros
Himerus. Pothos. God of desire and longing for love. Personification of sexual desire.
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Hubris
Hybris. God and personification of the lack of restraint and insolence.
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Hygieia-health
Goddess of health, and the daughter of Aesculapius. Her symbol was a serpent drinking from a cup in her hand.
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Hymen
Son of Aphrodite and Dionysus. The god of marriage. He was represented as a young man carrying a torch and veil, a mature version of Eros.
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Hymenaeus
God of marriage.
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Hyperion-dweller on high
The Titan god of light, he was the father of the sun, the moon, and the dawn.
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Hypnos
Also known as Somnus, Hypnos was the god of rest and/or sleep, and a twin brother of Thanatos, the god of death. He was the father of Morpheus, the god of dreams. He had many other sons, among whom were Icelus, who brought dreams of animals and Phantasus, who brought dreams of things. From his names we get the words hypnotize and somnambulism.
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Olympians , Other Major Gods ,
Minor Gods and Demi Gods A-D ,
Minor Gods and Demi Gods E-H ,
Minor Gods and Demi Gods I-P ,
Minor Gods and Demi Gods Q-Z ,
Greek Myths, Legends and Heroes A-B ,
Greek Myths, Legends and Heroes C-H ,
Greek Myths, Legends and Heroes I-O ,
Greek Myths, Legends and Heroes P-Z

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