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Egyptian Mythological Characters M-Z


Min(Pan)
A god of fertility.
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Mo
Sometimes the god, sometimes the goddess, of Truth and Justice. Is depicted with ostrich feathers on the head.
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Mut(Hera)
Mut is seen as the mother, the nurturing force behind all things while her husband Amon is the great energy or creative force. In ancient Egyptian, 'mut' means mother. The mother of Khonsu. Mut is another name of Isis.
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The Neb-Ti
The ruling goddesses of the north (Uadgit) and south (Nekhebet, the protector of childbirth).
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Nekhbet(Eileithyia)
Guardian Goddess. Lady of the South. Vulture Goddess. Protectress and Mother of the king. Goddess of motherhood, childbirth, protection.
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Ogdoad
The name of eight Egyptian deities who were especially worshipped in Hermopolis in Upper Egypt. They form the basis of the creation myth. The Ogdoad consist of four gods and four goddesses who together personify the essence of the primordial chaos before the creation of the world. The goddesses were represented as either frogs or humans with frog heads. The gods were represented as either snakes or humans with snake heads.
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Pasht
The goddess of Virtue. She is pictured with a cat's head.
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Ra
The sun god, and leader of the gods, he was pictured as a child in the early morning, a man in his prime at noon, and an old man in the evening. He traveled through the underworld at night to be reborn at dawn.
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Renenet(Tyche)
Cobra Goddess of harvest. Fertility Goddess. Nurturer of children. Personification of Fortune. Goddess of the eighth month of the Egyptian calender, children, luck, justice, plenty, good fortune, and the like. Depicted as a woman with the head of a snake.
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Sati(Juno)
also known as Satis and Satet, is an Egyptian archer goddess who personified the waterfalls of the river Nile.
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Sebek (Sobek)(Cronus)
means "crocodile". Also called Seb. Was depicted as having a crocodile face. During the Middle Kingdom he was merged with Re (Sobek-Re) and was worshipped as primordial deity and creator-god.
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Sekhet
The ennead of Memphis was headed by a triad composed of the father Ptah, the mother Sekhet, and the son Imhotep, main gods of Egypt during the Memphite dynasties.
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Serapis
means "underworld". An ancient Egyptian god of the lower world, also worshiped in ancient Greece and Rome. He is shown as having a bull's head.
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Selket
The beautiful scorpion goddess Selket, has her scorpion strike death to the wicked. She also saves the lives of the innocent stung by a scorpion.
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Setekh
means "hound".
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Shu(Atlas) and Tefnut(Artemis)
They were Ra's children. Shu was the god of air and held up the sky. Tefnut, his sister and wife, was the goddess of dew and rain. They were the parents of Geb and Nut.
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Smotef
Another of the four lesser gods of the dead. His name means shaper, and he has a jackal's head.
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Snouf
Another of the four lesser gods of the dead. His name means bleeder, and he has a hawk's head.
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Sottef
He sometimes replaces Smotef as one of the four lesser gods of the dead. His name means cutter or purifier.
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Tauret
means "hippopotamus". This was the animal form of the great mother goddess Mut. As a nurturing force Tauret was depicted as a pregnant hippopotamus with long teats, standing on her hind legs and carrying the scrolls of protection. As a fierce animal force protecting the children Tauret was pictured as a lion-headed hippo carrying a dagger.
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Tefnut
Tefnut is the goddess of daybreak (the goddess of dew and rain) and is associated with the mountains from which the sun rises.
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Ua
Goddess of the underworld (as mentioned in the Book of the Dead).
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Uadjet
A goddess of the underworld who endows justice and truth. She is pictured as a cobra (sometimes winged and crowned) or as a snake with the face of a woman. She is the sister of Nekhebet, and together they are known as the Nebti.
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Uat
Goddess of water.
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Udjat
There are two versions of the "Udjat eye":
1. It is the Eye of Ra (or of Heru). It refers to the eye of the falcon-headed god Horus after it had been torn out by Seth during one of their never-ending battles over the throne of Egypt. The eye was then healed by Thoth, hence it was considered a symbol of healing or revitalization.
2. According to some other texts, Atum (the creator) gave birth to his son by spitting him out. His daughter he vomited out. Shu (the son) represented the air and Tefnut (the daughter) was a goddess of moisture. After some time Shu and Tefnut became separated from their father and lost in the watery chaos of Nu. Atum, who had only one eye (the Udjat eye), which was removable, removed it and sent it in search of his children. In time they returned with the eye. At this reunion Atum wept tears of joy. Where these tears hit the ground, men grew (the beginning of the human race).
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Umm s-Subyan
A death goddess who causes infants to die.
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Unen-em-hetep
Goddess protector of the dead.
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Urt-hekau
The lion goddess (sometimes the lion god) who is the protective power in the Eye of Horus.
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